Tapping

Discuss playing styles and techniques, or share your own here.
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bobber
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Joined: Fri Mar 19, 2004 9:11 pm

Does anyone have good tutorials or lessons on how to tap because i would like to know.. and tapping looks fun!
mxer
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its not really that hard to do.Its just using your fretting hand to hold down notes in anyway.start out buy tapping triads.take the 1st,3rd, and 5th tones from a major scale and find were they are on one string.Start out buy fretting the 2 bottom notes with your fretting hand and the top note with your picking hand.Now take that idea and run with it!!!11 :D
Skyscraper
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If you just want something accessible and fun to play without having to think about it too much, then triads are the way to go. You'll need to know them as they are the basics of tapping anyway, if you're going to get into it, plus you can stick triad patterns into just about any solo with a reasonably consistent and rock-esque backing rythm. That's not to say you should be doing tapping in every solo you ever play all of the time, there should be a point to it when you do it, but for mucking about it's good fun! Some suggestions for starting to learn tapping:

T = tap with index finger or middle finger of picking hand.
P = pull-off (note fingered with fretting hand).
H = hammer-on (note fingered with fretting hand).

Example 1:
___Section_1______Section_2_______Section_3_______Section_4___.
__T_P__P__H_____T_P___P__H_____T_P__P__H_____T_P__P__H___.

¦-17--13--10--13-¦-18--13--10--13-¦-20--13--10--13-¦-18--13--10--13-¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦----------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦----------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦----------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦----------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦----------------------¦---------------------¦

Play each of the sections within this example four times or eight times (four sounds better in my view, but if you're establishing a rythm you might want eight repetitions to begin with) before moving on to the next section. Seeing as this example, as with all of the ones I'll give you, fits in with the most simple pentatonic minor scale, it can be used with a wider variety of rythm parts than other scales may allow. As this section goes with D pentatonic minor, any rythm section in Dm can have this applied to it (as far as I know anyway!).

Example 2:

__T_P__P___H____T_P___P__H____T_P___P__H____T_P___P__H___.

¦-19--15--12--15-¦-20--15--12--15-¦---------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦-19--15--12--15-¦-20--15--12--15-¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦---------------------¦

Same idea, playing each section four or eight times before switching to the next one. If you play each section eight times really fast, you'll notice it's actually the beginning of fast solo in Metallica's 'One'! Anyway, the first example kept you on one string, this makes you switch between two while remaining quite simple to play, so it's good practice without being terribly difficult. This fits in with E pentatonic minor, so anything in Em is ideal for this example to be played. Of course, if you wanted to adapt it to another key, just move the whole thing up or down by as many frets as you need.

Example 3:

__T_P__P___H____T_P___P__H____T_P___P__H___T_P__P__H___.

¦-17--13--10--13-¦-18--13--10--13-¦-15--12--8--12--13--12--8--12-¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦--------------------------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦--------------------------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦--------------------------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦--------------------------------------¦
¦---------------------¦---------------------¦--------------------------------------¦

This section goes back to D pentatonic minor again. Play each section four times before changing to the next one. You'll notice there a re only three sections here instead of the four which the other two examples have. For timing, the third section should last the same length of time here as the first two sections together. Basically, it would be four sections as the pattern is the same as in the other examples, except that your tapping hand (your picking hand) is alternating between the 15th fret (G) and the 13th fret (F). The first two sections for this (and example one, since the first two sections of both are identical) can be heard on Ozzy Osbourne's 'Mr Crowley' (Blizzard Of Ozz album, played by Randy Rhoads). This whole example works particularly well where the backing rythm is Dm (Section 1) - Bb (Section 2) - C (Sections 3 and 4). As for well-known songs where you could try playing this over the top of the rythm, I would suggest you try it with 'Sultans Of Swing' by Dire Straits, or Fleetwood Mac's 'Go Your Own Way'. You an probably think of other songs more to your taste, but those songs would allow for this example to be played with them.

I apologise if that was oversimplistic, just that it takes that for me to understand a lot of things related to guitar playing so I thought it might be better to keep the explanation as basic as possible. Anyway, I hope that's helped at least in some way, and have fun getting the hang of tapping - it is very addictive when you get a taste for it!

Take care,
Steven.
bobber
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Thank you so much Steven. It helped me out alot! I like in-depth examples and teachings like that one you just gave me. THANKS agian!!!!
mxer
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Sorry i would have done more like he did but i cant type worth shit
Inside Out
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My advice would be to treat your tapping hand as an extension of your fretting hand. Use the same approach to vibrato and melody that you do with your fretting hand. Many players fall into a wanky triplet vibe when they tap, try to avoid the cliches and develop strong melodic ideas. Much more impressive than just flash.
mxer
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Dont forget about chords too!You can play closed chords like a piano or big extended chords over 4 and 5 octaves :D
Skyscraper
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Bobber, it was a pleasure to help. Since I joined this message board (very recently) I've needed advice as well and have found everyone here to be a great help, so it was nice to be able to give something back to someone on here. Hope you're having fun with tapping!

Of course, the other guys who have posted after me saying that you should look at other stuff beyond triad pattern tapping are correct, as you don't want to get stuck in a rut and it's also fun to explore tapping further than just the basics. However, I think it's maybe more fun and accessible (easy to grasp) to start with basic triad patterns when you're first trying to get used to the basics of how to tap and establishing some good habits of technique (like minimising interference caused by brushing against other strings or just hitting the wrong strings with your fretting or picking hand). Once you get the hang of the basics, then you can look into more complex tapping techniques and patterns (I still don't have the hang of everything by any means), but for now I thought that what I posted might be a good introduction to tapping.

The main thing though, as with any aspect of practise, is that you should gear it towards something that you will enjoy and that will be fun. Triad tapping patterns provided that for me when I wanted to learn more about tapping, in your case once the novelty has worn off and you want even more of a challenge with your tapping then I'm sure you'll move on when you're ready. In the meantime, just enjoy what you're doing!
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