Scalloped vs. Normal

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adanniels
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Hello, I was wondering what the different aspects were between scalloped and normal fretboards and what is special about only scalloping half the fretboard.

I know the basics of scalloping so don't bare me with that.

I was wondering because I was thinking about putting a scalloped fretboard on my design in progress, "A.K.A. The Sicile Guitar"
Zeds.Ded
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you only have to put a small amount of pressure on a scalloped fret for the not to play, as your finger is not touching the fret board. this means you can play very lightly and fast (Yngwie Malmsteen) and you can get amazing vibrato too. the problem is it is a lot harder to play the note in tune as it only takes small amounts of pressure to play the note out of tune, so you would need a very good intonation when playing a scalloped neck. this makes playing chords and rhythm work quite difficult to play in tune.
TheRocKsTaR777
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Word..I've got a light scallop on my fender strat..its amazing cuz you can some pretty damn good speed on it..but honestly,I recommend getting it done from a very reputable luthier..The guy that did mine didnt do such a perfect job and so my guitar suffers from fret buzzing.Turns out im gonna need the fretboard sanded down a bit and the frets filed.I kinda wish I hadnt done the scallop now,as the guitar sounds like shit in certain areas of the board..
Chris Brooks
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Some people only scallop half the neck because there's a misconception that chords will be out of tune on a scalloped fingerboard - or simply because some ppl prefer the feel of a regular fingerboard where they do most of their chord work.

You actually have to press quite hard down toward the fingerboard to make the string go sharp. In most cases, the fact that bending is so damn easy after scalloping makes some people slightly bend their chord out of tune - i.e. pull the strings ever so light downward (usually) - not because of the scalloping but, because the scalloping aids their tendency to pull their chords a bit. If your technique is good and your ears are good, you will never have anything to worry about.

Legato playing is a little different with scalloped fingerboards. The extra grip on the strings is not really what ou want with high speed legato which is better when you can glide across the strings and slide into various positions. Because legato features so prominently in my style these days I don't use scalloped fingerboards anymore.
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another virtuoso
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Chris Brooks wrote:If your technique is good and your ears are good, you will never have anything to worry about.
+1

unless you apply way to much pressure to the strings when you play to begin with, you wont have a problem pushing strings sharp while playing on a scalloped neck. like chris said, it is easier to do when playing chords, but still not really a big problem if you've got adequate technique and a decent set of ears,
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al
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i live scalloped frets. once u know what your dowing and know what ti should sound liek its fine, i dont find the preasure thing a problem unless u press reallyu really hard on the fret, ts not really an issue much more fun vibrato and bends and genereally more fun to play on, if i was to get a custom guitar it would most definitly have some, intonations problems arent really a prob once its set up right, its jus a different feel to me
Zeds.Ded
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i would love to try a guitar with scallops to see what they are like
NOT!!!
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Zeds.Ded wrote:this means you can play very lightly and fast.

huh??? Not really!

A scalloped fretboard plays just like a normal fretboard, the only diffrence is, when you bend a note, you can go "under the string" with your finger, because there´s no wood, so you have a better grip while bending. If you ever played a guitar with jumbo frets, this is exactly the same feeling (except the bends). It has nothing to do with playing faster or lighter.
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al
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jesus my typings disasterous....


I should really edit that... but i wont :) ...but yeah try it, when i was reading up on scalloped frets most of the stuff i was reading was an exaduration really, i find it way easier to play with them, its fine, just a different feel


and i hate jumbo frets, i like my frets small and fretwire thin and pointy :mad:
NOT!!!
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yeah, it´s just preference, how you´d like to bend. And someone who can´t play in tune because of too much pressureshould rethink his whole technique ;).

I mean how can you ever play with your feelings, if you push it like hell?

Just imagine your guitarneck was your friend (I mean YOUR friend ;)), you would´t hurt him, would you?
Azrael
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Zeds.Ded wrote:you only have to put a small amount of pressure on a scalloped fret for the not to play, as your finger is not touching the fret board. this means you can play very lightly and fast (Yngwie Malmsteen) and you can get amazing vibrato too. the problem is it is a lot harder to play the note in tune as it only takes small amounts of pressure to play the note out of tune, so you would need a very good intonation when playing a scalloped neck. this makes playing chords and rhythm work quite difficult to play in tune.
This may sound stupid, but would a Floyd Rose fix all of these problems? I started out music playing clarinet (and still do), and the concept of a trem simply amazed me: In tune all the time, every time. Combined with frets, which are engineered for exact intonation, it meant tonal flawlessness.

EDIT: I'd delighted to find some Irishmen here. :D How goes life in the pale land?
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GuitarBizarre
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Not really. The floyds are great for keeping things in tune when you're diving and bending, but its actually a bit of a pain to get the fully in tune to start with, because the bridge floats. Plus the problem with intonation with scalloped frets, is that its easy to push the string further down than is really needed to fret the note, which increases tension and raises pitch, so things sound horrible, if you don't have the right touch.

Bar chords can be a bitch on scallops too. Why do you think wingie goes for all those fancy 4 note chords that you can play with each finger?
Zeds.Ded
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NOT!!! wrote: huh??? Not really!

huh??? Ya really!


ive heard tones of Yngwie interviews and whenever he is asked why he uses scallops his main reason is that you can play very fast and use a very light hand because of them, and the vibrato of course. and in theory that makes sense because when you press the string the fretboard is not blocking your finger like on a normal fretboard. unless theres secret sauce on it of course :wink:
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al
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people explaining scalloped frets is overated... its aok and fine thats all
NOT!!!
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Zeds.Ded wrote: ive heard tones of Yngwie interviews and whenever he is asked why he uses scallops his main reason is that you can play very fast and use a very light hand because of them
huh, really???

I have a video of Malmsteen, where he says the exact antonym. "Actually it´s harder to play on a scalloped fretboard than on a normal one".

What do we do now?


You never even tried a scalloped one, I own one. So who may be right?
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