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Stretching the strings----tips and shortcuts here please...

Posted: Fri May 27, 2005 7:55 am
by alienillusions
Hey guys,

Only took me an hour and a half to get my strings fully stretched ! :shock: (can stretch twice and still returns to pitch) and my guitar tuned... I was really reefing on them too, stretching and shaking them violently up and down the length of the string...The G string for some reason took a long time to get stretched....Rich Harris claims he can fully stretch a set in 10 minutes..(?!?!?!?) How does he do that without breaking strings? Any tips or hints or shortcuts to speed up the process and for better tuning stability would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Posted: Sat May 28, 2005 10:44 am
by Optiquest
It shouldnt take that long, I can do it in 15 minutes easily. Get a rag so you don't slice up your finger(speaking from experience). Just go side to side like your doing really wide air vibratos while go up and down the string, dont go over board on the e(or the b). You wont break any of the wound strings

Posted: Sat May 28, 2005 2:25 pm
by Big Bad Bill
I always thought stretching strings was unnecessary with modern strings-especially with all this cryogenic this and that!! I never stretch my strings and never have tuning problems. A piece of wire will obey Young's Modulus (within it 's elastic limits, of course) and therefore extension is proportional to force applied-it's extension is linear until it yields and snaps!

If you had to stretch out your strings, the best way to stretch out a string would be to simply tune up a couple of pitches above concert pitch-but I don't think you need to with modern strings.

Posted: Sat May 28, 2005 3:22 pm
by alienillusions
Big Bad Bill wrote:I always thought stretching strings was unnecessary with modern strings-especially with all this cryogenic this and that!! I never stretch my strings and never have tuning problems. A piece of wire will obey Young's Modulus (within it 's elastic limits, of course) and therefore extension is proportional to force applied-it's extension is linear until it yields and snaps!

If you had to stretch out your strings, the best way to stretch out a string would be to simply tune up a couple of pitches above concert pitch-but I don't think you need to with modern strings.
You obviously don't have a trem sysytem on your guitar....."Modern" strings, eh? :lol:

Posted: Sat May 28, 2005 3:48 pm
by saxaxe
Boil them before you put them on your guitar for about 15-20 minutes. Gets rid of that new string tone and stretches them for ya too.

Posted: Sat May 28, 2005 10:15 pm
by realgreenfire
hmm very interesting that you say boil the strings first.. havent thought of that.. but may i ask what boiling them will do with the stretching?

yeah, it still takes me a little while to get my strings on, usually about 30-45 minutes for the whole set on my floating trem..

Posted: Sun May 29, 2005 6:39 am
by Andelusion
It takes me at the most 10-15 minutes to stretch my strings, i use Ernie Ball regular 9s, can't understand it taking over an hour(!??!) even over 45mins would be strange.

What strings are you using?

Posted: Sun May 29, 2005 8:20 am
by alienillusions
realgreenfire wrote:hmm very interesting that you say boil the strings first.. havent thought of that.. but may i ask what boiling them will do with the stretching?

yeah, it still takes me a little while to get my strings on, usually about 30-45 minutes for the whole set on my floating trem..
Hammett boils 'em as well. I'm using 9-42 D'Addario's and I would worry about aging the strings too quickly by boiling them. I'm still having problems keeping the bastard in tune. My non-trem POS cheapo guitar stays in tune much better...

Posted: Sun May 29, 2005 2:27 pm
by Big Bad Bill
No, I do have a trems on my custom Ibanez and JS 1000-I couldn't live without a Floyd Rose. I never have a problem or need to stretch them in. Unless I'm inadvertantly stretching them when I put them on- but I doubt it. I only tune up when I restring and after that just need a bit of fine tuning from time to time.

Boiling strings was a thing that people did in the 'old days' to revitalise dead strings. It just melted all the oil and crud from out of the windings etc making them 'zingy' again. It worked but made the strings brittle and more prone to snapping. That's why we don't do it anymore! I guess Hamett has somebody to change his strings every day so longevity isn't an issue. It might explain his lousy solos too! :wink:

Yes, modern strings. The alloys used in modern strings are different to those used in the 60s and 70s. Hell, mine are covered in Goretex and last me a year!

Hahaha

Posted: Mon May 30, 2005 7:28 pm
by Birdman
In Goretex? Isn't that something they use to make jackets etc waterproof? Or a type of material that is waterproof?

I'd hate to hear your guitar then if you don't have to stretch your strings. I use NEW strings all the time, and I play a Strat (no trem, bridge locked down with heavier springs etc) and if I don't stretch them, they are out of tune after about 2bars into anything. Maybe you buy those "pre stretched" model strings? haha

Posted: Tue May 31, 2005 2:08 am
by Big Bad Bill
Yes, the wound strings are covered in a very thin layer of Goretex which prevents gunk getting into the strings and keeps them sounding zingier for longer! I really have no problems with tuning. I restring, tune up and that's it until I change the strings again (in about a years time!). The only thing that changes my tuning is excessive ambient heat-but hear in the UK, that's very rare :wink:

I still don't believe you need to stretch strings-they're like springs-if you stretch them, they return to their original length unless you exceed their elastic limit which is the point you get plastic deformation, yielding and finally breakage. Hasn't anyone studied this in Physics? Basically:

When a specimen made from an isotropic material is subjected to uniaxial tension, say in the x direction, sxx is the only non-zero stress. The strains in the specimen are obtained by,

Image

The modulus of elasticity in tension, also known as Young's modulus E, is the ratio of stress to strain on the loading plane along the loading direction,

Common sense (and the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics) indicates that a material under uniaxial tension must elongate in length. Therefore the Young's modulus E is required to be non-negative for all materials,

E > 0

A Newtonian material will also return to it's original length once the tension is released and the elactic properties of the material remain unchanged. I guess this assumes that strings are made from a Newtonian material which I suppose they may not be!

If you find you need to stretch your strings, I'd suggest what you're actually doing is somehow locking machine heads, freeing the slippage in the nut groove etc etc rather than 'strecthcing in' your strings.


Posted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 5:41 am
by alienillusions
Big Bad Bill wrote:Yes, the wound strings are covered in a very thin layer of Goretex which prevents gunk getting into the strings and keeps them sounding zingier for longer! I really have no problems with tuning. I restring, tune up and that's it until I change the strings again (in about a years time!). The only thing that changes my tuning is excessive ambient heat-but hear in the UK, that's very rare :wink:

I still don't believe you need to stretch strings-they're like springs-if you stretch them, they return to their original length unless you exceed their elastic limit which is the point you get plastic deformation, yielding and finally breakage. Hasn't anyone studied this in Physics? Basically:

When a specimen made from an isotropic material is subjected to uniaxial tension, say in the x direction, sxx is the only non-zero stress. The strains in the specimen are obtained by,

Image

The modulus of elasticity in tension, also known as Young's modulus E, is the ratio of stress to strain on the loading plane along the loading direction,

Common sense (and the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics) indicates that a material under uniaxial tension must elongate in length. Therefore the Young's modulus E is required to be non-negative for all materials,

E > 0

A Newtonian material will also return to it's original length once the tension is released and the elactic properties of the material remain unchanged. I guess this assumes that strings are made from a Newtonian material which I suppose they may not be!

If you find you need to stretch your strings, I'd suggest what you're actually doing is somehow locking machine heads, freeing the slippage in the nut groove etc etc rather than 'strecthcing in' your strings.

That sounds like a lot of pontification in your medulla oblongata! Isotropic and good for your cholestorol! :lol: Hey, I'm mainly stretching because the supposed 'master of all things Ibanez' (Rich Harris at ibanezrules.com), says that they must be stretched if you own a floating trem if you want them to return to pitch after whammy abuse....What kind of strings are you using that have a Goretex coating. Don't they use that stuff in cold weather gear such as ski gloves?

Posted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 7:11 am
by Big Bad Bill
Don't worry-I don't what it all means either! But it's good to question things.